2017 Shortlist

ACHIEVING RESULTS AT SCALE AWARD

NHS Lanarkshire        
Using Anticipatory Guidance and a comprehensive review at 13-15 months to Improve Outcomes for Children across all localities in North Lanarkshire

Only 76% of children in North Lanarkshire were meeting their developmental milestones at the 27-30 month Child Health Review – less than the national aim of 85%.

The Coatbridge Health Visiting team used quality improvement to test and pilot a new child health review at 13-15 months to deliver anticipatory guidance to families about children’s developmental needs.

Results show that 92% of children involved in the pilot 13-15 month review are now meeting their developmental goals at the subsequent 27-30 month review.  Furthermore, North Lanarkshire is now achieving above national average scores, with 81% of children meeting their development goals.

The approach is now being rolled out to all six health visiting teams in North Lanarkshire, helping to improve outcomes for even more children and families.

South Lanarkshire CPP           
Reducing Inequalities in the coverage and uptake of the 27-30 month universal Child Health Review

South Lanarkshire health and social care partnership identified inequalities in the coverage of the 27 month Child Health Review, with uptake from families ranging from 52% to 91%.

Family uptake in areas of multiple deprivation was noted to be particularly low and a quality improvement package was developed, tested and implemented. This was supported by health visiting Improvement Champions, who empowered staff to make changes and apply better use of local data.

As a result of achieving and sustaining improvement at scale, the health visiting teams have achieved an incredible 26% increase in uptake of the child health review and exceeded their improvement aim.  Significantly, they have closed the uptake inequity gap from 11% to 4% between children living in the most and least deprived areas.

VSA (Third Sector) Aberdeen
The EII Project (Engage – Include – Improve) delivered by ASNAP (Additional Support Needs Advisory Project)

The Additional Support Needs Advisory Project, part of VSA, supports early years practitioners working with children with additional support needs who sometimes need extra help integrating into the nursery environment or adapting to routine. This can be quite challenging due to their behaviour or disability.

Using quality improvement methodology, a new Engage-Include-Improve model has been implemented and tested to help change existing practice and delivery.  The model has included training courses, new sensory areas for children, skills support for early years practitioners and regular reviews to inform ongoing improvements.

The model has completely changed the way the advisory project works and VSA has rolled out the model to more locations than originally intended, an indication of widespread recognition of its value across Aberdeen.

The service has further developments planned for this year, which include a “train the trainers” course and storybook presentation for children.

 

CO-PRODUCTION WITH FAMILIES AND OUR SERVICES AWARD

Dundee City Council
Community Learning & Development Adult Learning Programme

Dundee City Council was keen to involve more dads in family learning after their local service data revealed they were underrepresented.

A quality improvement project called Dads & Bairns was implemented to test a different approach.

Over the course of a six-week Saturday morning programme, 14 dads and 16 children took part.  Ongoing feedback was gathered from dads and children to help inform the sessions.

As a result, Dads & Bairns has more than doubled the number of dads involved in family learning, and dads have reported growing confidence in supporting their children’s learning.

A second programme is now underway and the learning from the programme has the potential to influence wider development with families.

East Renfrewshire Council
Places to Play

Outdoor play promotes the development of children’s physical, mental, social and emotional health and wellbeing.

With this in mind, East Renfrewshire Council has tested and implemented ‘Places to Play’ – a quality improvement project designed to encourage 70% of primary three pupils, who have now moved into primary four, at St Mark’s Primary School to play outdoors at least twice a week for twenty minutes out with education.

Taking a partnership approach, involving parents, pupils, teachers and a third sector agency, Places to Play sessions have been implemented to measure children’s engagement.  Parents have been involved in local area walks to identify safe places to play and data continues to be collected to inform future development.

Early feedback is positive, suggesting this innovative project has the potential to be scaled up across other classes and schools.

Midlothian Sure Start
Lawfield Community Project Partnership

Lawfield Primary School in Midlothian was experiencing difficulty with low morale, a high level of exclusions, lack of community involvement and poor attainment levels.

When the local authority approached the voluntary sector for help, the Lawfield Community Project Partnership was formed to create a multi-agency intervention.

Using quality improvement methodology, the partners delivered a package of support, including regular meetings between families and staff; art, play and music sessions; one to one support where it was needed; a Dads inclusion project; sleep advice; a befriending service; and family counselling.

The impact has been transformational!  There has been an 85% reduction in exclusions and a reduction of 741 in absence days.  Plans are now underway to roll-out this unique collaborative approach to nine additional primary schools and one secondary school.

 

EXCELLENCE FOR QI IN MATERNITY, NEONATAL AND PAEDIATRIC SERVICES

Royal Hospital for Children, NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde
Helping Us Grow Group (HUGG): Our model of family integrated care delivered by staff and patient families of the neonatal unit

The Helping Us Grow Group – or HUGG for short – is a unique collaboration of staff and families at the neonatal unit within Glasgow’s Royal Hospital for Children.

Parents wanted to be more involved in their child’s care and, in response, the team designed, tested and evaluated a unique model of family integrated care, built around staff and parent engagement.

As a result of developing and trialling new innovations and applying quality improvement, while continually listening to parents and reviewing practice, the entire team is now fully engaged with families, and they have created a new connected and collaborative culture in their busy neonatal unit.

HUGG’s unique approach is improving the experience of families of sick children, helping to meet long-term health and wellbeing outcomes, and inspiring change in teams throughout the UK.

Royal Hospital for Children, NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde
Ventilator Associated Pneumonia and Quality Improvement – a clinical care bundle within a tertiary paediatric intensive care unit to reduce the compound rate of VAP

Staff in the paediatric intensive care unit at the Royal Hospital for Children in Glasgow have been working hard to reduce the incidence of ventilator associated pneumonia among children in its care.

An improvement project involving medical, nursing and education staff was undertaken which included a video and e-learning package, one-to-one lectures and assessment for nurses.  The model for improvement was used to test changes in processes and monitor the impact of these through data collection.

The initial aim of the project was to achieve a 50% reduction in ventilator associated pneumonia among children.  Through consistent effort, embedded practice and ongoing quality improvement within the unit, a 78% reduction has been achieved.

With a sustainable and scalable model now in place, there is scope for other clinical teams to benefit from this innovative quality improvement project.

NHS Lanarkshire
The Paediatric Nurses at Out of Hours Centre

 NHS Lanarkshire became the first health board in the UK to place paediatric nurses within a primary care out of hours service.

Seventy-five per cent of children who were referred by the out of hours service to the paediatric ward at Wishaw General Hospital did not require admission.

To reduce stress on families and pressure on staff, the health board placed paediatric nurses within out of hours services during busy periods to address the four most common conditions.

Through research and data analysis, department collaboration and staff engagement, and a process of trialling and testing optimum service times, the project has reduced the number of children being unnecessarily transferred to the general hospital.

This ground-breaking quality improvement project scores highly with patients, who are receiving the right care in the right environment.

 

EXCELLENCE FOR QI IN EARLY YEARS

NHS Ayrshire and Arran
The SPIN team universal early years approach – promoting communication friendly environments

The speech and language therapy SPIN team at NHS Ayrshire and Arran set out to test, evaluate and deliver initiatives that support early years establishments to have communication friendly environments.  The team aimed for 90% of early years establishments in North Ayrshire to engage with the project, with a nominated communication champion appointed at each location.

Working in partnership with North Ayrshire Council, this quality improvement project has been driven by a desire to deliver universal speech and language support at the earliest opportunity in a child’s development.

The universal approach has seen the successful development of a communication champion network, training packages for early years staff and positive engagement with parents, including workshops, parent evenings, drop-in sessions and community events.

Training attendance rates are high, as are engagement levels with parents.  Early years practitioners and parents and carers are reporting the positive impact that the project has had on them and their children.  Ninety per cent of early years establishments now have an appointed and active communication champion, and the team is seeking to launch ‘Communication Friendly Environment’ accreditation for early years establishments to further develop their work.

South Lanarkshire Community Planning Partnership
Effective communication pathway early years, with developmental or wellbeing concerns at their 27-month Child Health Review

The South Lanarkshire Community Planning Partnership set out to improve the exchange of appropriate information between health visiting and early years professionals for children with developmental or wellbeing concerns.

Working with 10 health visiting teams and 104 local authority and partnership nurseries, a reliable process for sharing GIRFEC wellbeing was established, helping to ease children’s transitions into nursery and in partnership with families.

This has led to a more co-ordinated partnership approach, and has informed an earlier nursery response and a staged intervention process, increasing support given to each child.  This is an example of innovative quality improvement work bringing together health visiting and early years education to improve outcomes for children in line with GIRFEC and the Universal Health Visiting Pathway.

VSA (Third Sector) Aberdeen
The EII Project (Engage – Include – Improve) delivered by ASNAP (Additional Support Needs Advisory Project)

The Additional Support Needs Advisory Project, part of VSA, supports early years practitioners working with children with additional support needs who sometimes need extra help integrating into the nursery environment or adapting to routine.  This can be quite challenging due to their behaviour or disability.

Using quality improvement methodology, a new Engage-Include-Improve model has been implemented and tested to help change existing practice and delivery.  The model has included training courses, new sensory areas for children, skills support for early years practitioners and regular reviews to inform ongoing improvements.

The model has completely changed the way the advisory project works and VSA has rolled out the model to more locations than originally intended, an indication of widespread recognition of its value across Aberdeen.

The service has further developments planned for this year which include a “train the trainers” course and storybook presentation for children.

 

EXCELLENCE FOR QI IN PRIMARY YEARS

Our Lady of Peace Primary School , Renfrewshire
Using Nurturing Approaches to improve children’s social and emotional wellbeing and readiness to learn

The Sunshine Group at Our Lady of Peace Primary School in Renfrewshire provides targeted nurture support to children with a range of emotional and social difficulties.

Using quality improvement methodology, the school created key changes to improve the children’s wellbeing, behaviour and readiness to learn – all of which can directly impact educational attainment.

Key changes that were tested and measured included monthly parent drop-in sessions, a planning tool to inform consistent delivery, integration with a whole-school approach to nurturing, and evaluation of the impact of the changes.

As a result, 93% of children in the Sunshine Group have made improvements in social, emotional and behaviour measures.  Furthermore, the whole-school nurturing approach has been implemented consistently across the school and is being up-scaled to include 22 other schools across the authority.

South Lanarkshire Community Planning Partnership
Closing the Gap: raising attainment for struggling writers

Supported by Scottish Attainment Challenge funding, St Paul’s Primary School in Hamilton set-up a unique quality improvement project to assist six pupils falling far behind the expected attainment levels in writing.

The teacher felt their self-esteem played a huge role in their lack of engagement with literacy, so a tailored package of after-school support was developed, combining one to one teacher guidance with social development. Play and social interaction were key parts of the project, and parental involvement was encouraged throughout.

Data was collected and showed how pupils made significant gains in attainment, along with improved engagement and behaviour. The approach has now been expanded within the school curriculum across all stages for target pupils.

The project demonstrates how a tailored approach to literacy and pupil behaviour can potentially transform the learning experience.

Clovenfords and Stow Primary Schools, Scottish Borders 
Raising Attainment in Numeracy and Literacy

Clovenfords and Stow Primary Schools in the Scottish Borders set out to reduce the percentage of children who were not achieving expected attainment levels in numeracy and literacy.

Quality improvement methodology has enabled the schools to develop a robust, effective and consistent approach to address the learning challenges.  A tailored programme of support is in place which sees a classroom assistant working with a pupil four times a week on agreed targets.  The pupil and classroom assistant record their progress weekly and this is shared with parents every six weeks.

At both schools, supported pupils have made significant progress.  This improvement approach is so successful that other schools across Scottish Borders Council have begun using it with equivalent levels of success.

 

EXCELLENCE FOR QI IN SECONDARY YEARS

Annan Academy, Dumfries and Galloway Council
Children and Young People Improvement Collaborative (raising attainment for all – small test of change)

Annan Academy was keen to use quality improvement methodology to explore ways to motivate pupils who found literacy challenging.

Using a small test of five pupils, innovative steps were taken to engage pupils in writing about their physical education performance – a key part of assessment at senior level.

Using a range of digital software, recorded video clips of their performance and a non-classroom environment, the pupils were able to engage more effectively with the work.

Data collection and evaluation of the test showed that pupils became more confident and were providing clearer, more accurate written information.

In addition, all pupils have progressed to National 5 level, a clear sign of higher attainment.

East Ayrshire Council, Stewarton Academy
Active Reading Strategies to support literacy development across the Stewarton Education Group

East Ayrshire Council’s Stewarton Education Group, which involves learners at early years, primary and secondary levels, was keen to develop a consistent approach to literacy development that would work at all levels of education.

Their quality improvement project, successfully developed and tested in a secondary school, focused on active reading strategies, involving pupils in all stages using an age appropriate reading mat to help them interpret text in a variety of contexts, in and outside the classroom.

Measurement and feedback from parents reveals the reading mat has transformed reading at home with their children and raised attainment.

The project has been so successful that staff have been approached by other parents, whose children are not involved in testing, to find out if they too can have access to a reading mat.

Stirling Learning Community
Developing a confident, numerate learning community

A seconded team representing early years, primary and secondary was set up to raise attainment levels in numeracy.

The team worked with Educational Psychology to use improvement methodology to ensure their interventions were as effective as possible.

A target group of parents and children were offered tailored support.  Parental engagement was increased through an information pack, workshop and website, and staff development sessions were rolled out across the learning community.

Initial feedback on the improvement project has been very positive – staff, parents and pupils all report feeling more confident and pupils are showing signs of improvement in numeracy.  The changes the team have developed are now being embedded across the learning community.

 

INSPIRING LEADERSHIP AWARD

Jan Adair
Head Teacher, Carleton Primary School, Fife Council

Jan Adair, Head teacher at Carleton Primary School in Fife has played a fundamental role in spreading improvement methodology throughout Fife schools.

Her passion and commitment to quality improvement has inspired others.  She has provided input at Fife-wide head teacher engagement events and local meetings, maximising opportunities to up skill others, increase their knowledge and understanding, and generating support and momentum for change.

Since January 2017, she has worked one day per week supporting Scottish Attainment Challenge Schools to apply the model for improvement.

More recently, this has extended to supporting other schools across Fife, delivering training, coaching and mentoring.

Jan’s unfaltering commitment makes her a true QI leader.

Kevin Brack
Head Teacher Brunstane Primary School, City of Edinburgh Council 

Brunstane Primary School Head teacher, Kevin Brack has a relentless focus on driving quality improvement work.

He has led and supported all teachers to become skilled in their use of the model for improvement. Teachers now use data regularly to identify areas for improvement and a range of QI tools to support their quality improvement work, including measurement plans and impact reports.

His leadership has both empowered and inspired others to take responsibility for and leadership of improvement as an integral part of their professional practice.

Not content with championing quality improvement within his own school, Kevin has also spread the QI messages across the school network in Edinburgh and shared his work at a national level.

Carrie Lindsay
Executive Director of Education & Children’s Services, Fife Council

Carrie Lindsay has recently taken up the post of Executive Director of Fife Council Education and Children’s Services, a position no doubt earned in part by her vision and leadership of quality improvement.

Carrie has demonstrated first class leadership to communicate her vision for quality improvement for Fife and to embed improvement methodology within day to day practice.  Her commitment to quality improvement has led to the allocation of funding and resources, as well as strategic buy-in across the Council.

She is passionate about supporting families to realise their potential and tackling inequalities.  Most importantly, Carrie values people, which means she has an inherent ability to connect with people – whether children, parents or staff – and help them be the best they can be.

 

MOST INSPIRING OR INNOVATIVE PROJECT AWARD

East Dunbartonshire Council
Play 2 Learn: Included, Engaged, Involved

Recognising that all children learn at different paces and in different ways, and to support transition from nursery, East Dunbartonshire Council identified a need to introduce more active play experiences into primary 1 to ensure an equitable approach to engaging all children.

A quality improvement test was carried out in three schools to improve learning and progression.

Over a 10-week period, 30 children with different challenges were observed, and data was collected to identify impact.

Data and evaluation shows that children have demonstrated improved wellbeing and involvement, and a decrease in difficulties.

Play has now become the main platform for learning in primary one, and ‘Play 2 Learn’ is being incorporated into teaching, rather than being an ‘add on’ to teaching, with plans to scale to all primary one children over the next three years.

Renfrewshire Council, Glencoats Primary School
Enhancing Early Level Learning Project

Glencoats Primary School in Paisley is located in the most deprived area in Scotland.  Data showed that pupils entering primary one arrived at a disadvantage in terms of their early skills, behaviours and health.

Recognising these developmental challenges, the school used quality improvement to test, evaluate and introduce the Enhancing Early Level Learning model – or EELL for short.  EELL was created to increase motivation in their youngest learners by being responsive to their developmental learning needs as opposed to using more traditional teaching methods.

The model encompasses the principles of early level development and relies heavily on the use of responsive and purposeful play experiences.  The infant department has been remodelled to immerse children in a nurturing environment and ethos.  Engaging families in building positive and productive relationships with school was at the core of this project.

The new ethos has completely transformed the school, with data and evaluation highlighting that 88% of all primary one pupils are now achieving a high level of health and wellbeing and motivation and involvement.

Scottish Fire and Rescue Service, North Lanarkshire
Working in partnership to provide Solihull Approach training

Working with North Lanarkshire Partnership, the Scottish Fire and Rescue Service has delivered Solihull approach training to their operational teams in North Lanarkshire, as well as a number of prevention officers across Scotland.

This is the first time anywhere in the UK that the fire and rescue service teams have been trained in the Solihull approach, which focuses on the emotional health and wellbeing of children and families.

Using improvement methodology, standard training has been tested and tailored for fire and rescue teams, helping them to understand child behaviours and engage with those most at risk.

This innovative project has delivered beyond original predictions, with actions to scale it up being supported by senior leaders and with additional funding.

 

QUALITY IMPROVEMENT CHAMPION AWARD

Matt Jobson
Quality Improvement Facilitator, NHS Grampian

As the Quality Improvement Facilitator within paediatric and neonatal services at NHS Grampian, Matt Jobson clearly has a duty to lead in the delivery of effective quality improvement methods.  His enviable enthusiasm and commitment to his work mean that everything he does is delivered to the highest of standards.

Through quality improvement methodology, he has helped to introduce new approaches to improve care for patients, including single nurse prescribing for basic medications, which has reduced delays in giving patients medication, and the introduction of a warm bundle in midwifery, which has led to a 35% reduction in babies with hypothermia.

Matt leads from the front line and sets himself the same standards of professional and personal conduct he expects of others.

Fiona Riddell
Classroom and Additional Needs Assistant, Stow Primary School, Scottish Borders Council

Everyone at Clovenfords and Stow Primary Schools believe that Fiona Riddell deserves an award for her relentless focus on improving outcomes for children.

Fiona took on the task of applying quality improvement to reduce the number of pupils achieving below expected levels in numeracy.  To achieve this, she implemented a significant shift in how she supported pupils, from a ‘broad sweep’ approach in the classroom to targeted one to ones with each pupil.

Fiona has taken her approach to other schools across the Scottish Borders area, advocating quality improvement and one-to one support for pupils to head teachers and support for learning teachers

She has also had visitors from Chile, America and Denmark come to learn how the quality improvement methodology can be applied to education in their countries.

Sacha Will
Improvement Manager (Integrated Children’s Services) / Early Years’ Service Manager (Acting), Aberdeen City Council

As Improvement Manager at Aberdeen City Council, Sacha Will has been instrumental in building capacity within the Community Planning Partnership (CPP) through the delivery of quality improvement learning programmes.

Now, through her new role, she will be using the quality improvement approach in relation to the expansion of Early Learning and Childcare.  Alongside this, she leads the QI programme which is open to the whole Integrated Children’s Services workforce.

Sacha is part of the Aberdeen City Innovate and Improve Programme Board, which is aiming to increase QI capacity across the Community Planning Partnership.  Her influence has had a positive effect on the level of commitment invested by the community planning team in quality improvement and she has enhanced understanding of quality improvement at various levels, including the leadership team.

 

TOP TEAM AWARD

East Ayrshire
Linking Language and Literacy (LLL)

East Ayrshire Council identified from the 27-30-month Child Health Review that improvement was needed in outcomes for early language and communication skills in the 0-3 age group.

A multi-agency team, involving Council, NHS, Health & Care Partnership, Leisure Trust and the local community, is responsible for the Linking Language and Literacy project.  Using quality improvement methodology, the team has tested and put in place activity to improve the capability of the workforce, build confidence within families and make services more accessible.

The group regularly reviews the progress of all their work to deliver best practice and improved outcomes.

The improvement project has resulted in a significant shift in culture and practice and has generated interest at a local, national and international level.

Obstetric Anaesthetic team, Princess Royal Maternity Hospital, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, NHS Greater Glasgow & Clyde
Reducing post dural puncture headache after epidural analgesia

Post Dural Puncture Headache is a relatively common but unpleasant complication following epidural placement during labour which impairs a mother’s ability to care for her new-born baby.

The Obstetric Anaesthetic team at Princess Royal Maternity Hospital in Glasgow wanted to reduce the headache rate and keep it consistently below the audit standards set by the Royal College of Anaesthetists, using quality improvement methodology.

Using an evidence-based ‘epidural insertion bundle’, epidural simulation, mandatory supervision targets, enhanced trainee communication and regular feedback with run charts, the team has seen marked success.

In two years, this ‘top team’ has achieved a 75% baseline reduction in post dural puncture headache, with average days between events increasing from 8 to 54, leading to more positive birth experiences for mums and babies.

Royal Hospital for Children, NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde
Helping Us Grow Group (HUGG): Our model of family integrated care delivered by staff and patient families of the Neonatal Unit

The Helping Us Grow Group – or HUGG for short – is a unique collaboration of staff and families at the neonatal unit within Glasgow’s Royal Hospital for Children.

Parents wanted to be more involved in their child’s care and, in response, the team designed, tested and evaluated a unique model of family integrated care, built around staff and parent engagement.

As a result of developing and trialling new innovations and applying quality improvement, while continually listening to parents and reviewing practice, the entire team is now fully engaged with families, and they have created a new connected and collaborative culture in their busy neonatal unit.

HUGG’s unique approach is improving the experience of families of sick children, helping to meet long-term health and wellbeing outcomes, and inspiring change in teams throughout the UK.

 

 

 

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